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October 2018 Archives

Study raises questions about the cohabitation effect

Researchers have long held that marriages are less likely to end in divorce when couples live together before walking down the aisle. However, a study published in the Journal of Marriage and Family's September 2018 issue suggests that what is known as the cohabitation effect may be extremely short-lived. Experts believe that couples who live together happily before getting married will find married life far less disrupting, but researchers from Stanford University discovered that this was only true for the first year of marriage.

Practical approaches to prenuptial agreements

Prenuptial agreements might not qualify as romantic, but engaged couples in Illinois have much to gain by defining the terms of a hypothetical divorce. These contracts allow people to establish how marital assets and debts will be divided in case the marriage ends. By negotiating the terms during a happy point in the relationship, people might avoid making emotional decisions when under stress in the future.

How having more money could increase divorce risk

Illinois couples who are wealthy might be more likely to get a divorce than those who have less money. Furthermore, the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers reports that divorce rates increase during times of economic surges and decrease during economic declines. Faced with the financial costs of divorce, some couples decide to stick it out.

Keep the details of divorce off social media

Social media has played an active role in destroying people's marriages over the last few years. Many attorneys have noticed a trend of people using Facebook to engage in extramarital relationships. Social media can continue to do harm during the divorce process if spouses do not know how to use it responsibly. 

New tax laws could make cost of divorce increase

People in Illinois who are getting a divorce and who anticipate giving or receiving alimony payments might want to try to complete their divorce before the end of 2018. Starting in 2019, alimony will no longer be tax-payable or tax-deductible, and experts say it is likely this will not benefit either the payer or the recipient.

Study looks at relationship between job and divorce

Librarians and farmers might be less likely to divorce than people who are in other professions. This was one of the findings of researchers at Stockholm University who examined Danish data for the relationship between work and divorce. The professions that had the highest divorce rate were in the hotel and restaurant industry.

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